Historical images compared with the current situations in the exact locations.
 

Normandy   Holland(1)   Ardennes   Worldwide  Miscellaneous

Eerde, September 17th 1944
Third Battalion of the 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment lands on Drop Zone A, outside Eerde. Both pictures were taken at the crossroads of two rural dirt tracks, locally known as Wolven Steeg and Veerse Heide.

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Now & Then photographs)

 

 

Son, September 17th 1944
Helena Hoeve farm in Son, Holland. This farm, owned by the Roefs family in 1944, was featured in our Battle Study #6 .
Located on the Southern edge of Drop Zones "B" and "C" and Landing Zone "W" of the 101st Airborne Division, Helena Hoeve served as an aid station, mainly for jump and landing injuries.
Medics and crippled paratroopers pose with members of the Roefs family.

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Now & Then photographs)
Son, September 17th 1944
Helena Hoeve. Medics rest on the lawn in front of the stable doors where the Roefs kept their horse cart. After the first day of Operation "Market Garden", casualties of the 101st were brought to the divisional hospital in Son proper.



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Now & Then photographs)
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Paratroopers of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment move East on Kerk Straat. The next day this street would suffer extensive damage due to a German bombing raid. It explains why buildings' fronts on the left in the "Now-" photo have receded, creating a wider sidewalk.

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Now & Then photographs)

 

Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Paratroopers of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment interrogate German prisoners on the Dommel River bridge near the Marienhage Convent. Both pictures are taken from Kanaal Straat, looking the corner of Bleek Straat.

"Then-"Photo through BeeldbankWO2.nl
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Now & Then photographs)
 
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944

Tanks of the 2nd Army enter Eindhoven from the South on Stratumse Dijk. Note the paratroopers at bottom of picture digging a foxhole in the garden of the old town hall of Eindhoven. The building is no longer there and we had to use a ladder to recreate the "Now"-photo.
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Now & Then photographs)
 

 

Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Contrary to the caption of the Now&Then comparison of this same "Then-"photo in our Holland(1)-page, these soldiers of "E"-Co./506th are not pictured on Hertog Straat, but on Vest Dijk.  We have left the erroneous caption to illustrate some of the pitfalls of this kind of investigative work.
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Now & Then photographs)
 

 

Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Tanks of the British XXXth Corps move North on Stratums Eind. Our "Now-"photograph was taken from the first floor of the Playerz Bar with the courteous permission of the proprietor.


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Now & Then photographs)
 

 

Eindhoven, September 20th 1944
Two days later the street is in ruins after the Luftwaffe's bombing raid on the liberated city of Eindhoven, which killed 200 civilians.

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Now & Then photographs)
 

 

 

Eindhoven, September 19th 1944
A reconnaissance unit of the German 107th Armored Brigade found this bridge on the outskirts of Eindhoven and judged it too weak to cross. Popular post-war believe has it that this bridge's weakness saved Eindhoven from a horrible tank battle. See our Battle Study #13.
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Now & Then photographs)

 

Nijmegen, September 20th 1944

 

A jeep driver speeds to bring a wounded trooper of the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, part of the US Army's 82nd Airborne Division, to an aid station. The wounds were sustained during the bloody battle for the Waal River Bridge. This is Dominicanen Straat in Nijmegen.

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Now & Then photographs)

 

Nijmegen, September 20th 1944

A Tommy gunner of the 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 82nd Airborne lies dead at the bottom of the steps of the North ramp of the Waal River Bridge. This paratrooper had, shortly before meeting his death so close to the 504th's objective, heroically crossed the river in small row boats under heavy fire.

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Now & Then photographs)

 

Zutphen, April 8th, 1945

Canadian engineers of the North Shore Regiment use a mine detector to remove mines on the approach to the bridge on Arnhemse Weg in Zutphen in the province of Gelderland. German troops had blown this bridge some days earlier to slow the Allied advance into Eastern Holland.

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Now & Then photographs)

 

Zutphen, April 8th, 1945

The bridge on Arnhemse Weg has collapsed into the river. Because the road deck remained relatively intact, engineers have marked a safe river crossing with white tape.

In 1947 this bridge was rebuilt and named "Canadians Bridge" in honor of the liberators of Zutphen.

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Now & Then photographs)

 

Zutphen, April 8th, 1945

A Bren Carrier is parked on Heeckeren Laan and its crew enjoy the spring sun.  Dutch citizens have come out of their homes to welcome the Canadian liberators.
 

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Now & Then photographs)

 

Oosterbeek, September 17th, 1944

Field grave of Frederick Walter Hopwood of Mollington (Cheshire), killed in action on the 17th of September 1944. After the battle Private Hopwood was reentered at the Oosterbeek Airborne Cemetery.
In the United Kingdom Hopwood's name is honored on a war monument in Shotwick (Cheshire)
Since the age of approximately 11, Battledetective Tom has had a particular interest in this soldier as shown in a drawing in an elementary school project he made at that age.

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Now & Then photographs)

 

's-Hertogenbosch, October 25th, 1944

Local hero Piet Kerssens is welcomed into his hometown 's-Hertogenbosch on Hinthamer Straat. Between 1941 and 1944 Piet had been in and out of German captivity for trying to escape to England. In August 1944 he was able to join the advancing Allied Forces and in October he was instrumental in liberating his city. Unfortunately Piet was wounded in action on October 26th at the bridge opposite the railway station, 1944 and died the following day.

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Now & Then photographs)

 

's-Hertogenbosch, October 26th, 1944

This dramatic and often published image of the liberation of 's-Hertogenbosch was taken by Army photographer Peter Handford.  A British tank takes position at the Esso fuel station on Willemsplein. Not to refuel but to attack the Willems Bridge. Mr. Van de Sande from 's-Hertogenbosch carries his young daughters into safety.
Today the Esso station is no longer there and a local man showed us the spot.

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Now & Then photographs)

 

Haarlem, October 25th, 1944

On this day Dutch policeman Fake Krist, who had been a fanatic Nazi, collaborating with the Germans, was executed by Dutch Resistance fighters. The Germans retaliated at this same location on Wester Gracht and shot 10 innocent civilians and torched four houses.
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Now & Then photographs)

 

Eindhoven September 18th, 1944
We (once more) stand corrected about the exact location of a photograph taken in Eindhoven, Holland, on the 18th of September 1944. The girl in the black-and-white striped socks in the period photograph, Annie Molteni of Frankrijk Straat No. 81 explained us in January 2012 that the photograph featuring her, Marietje van der Vorst, Annie's brother Calimero Molteni, choir director "Ciske" Bakers, the Van den Broek sisters and one (and a half) American paratrooper was taken right in the front yard of her home. We have visited Annie and took a correct comparison photo of her front yard.


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Now & Then photographs)

 

Eindhoven September 18th, 1944

Grote Berg in front of the main police station.
The city of Eindhoven has just been liberated by the US 101st Airborne Division and members of the P.A.N. (Partizanen Actie Nederland; Partisans Action Netherlands) ride patrols in - and on top of- a jalopy. Citizens cheer them on. Later this day, the crowd in front of the police station grew when the word spread through the city that arrested collaborators where brought to the police station.

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Now & Then photographs)

 

Eindhoven September 18th, 1944
Grote Berg in front of the main police station.
Almost the same location as in the previous comparison; note the twin towers of the Saint Catharina Church on Kerk Straat in the background. The atmosphere is jubilant.


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Now & Then photographs)

 

Eindhoven September 18th, 1944
Dommel Straat at the Van den Briel & Verster Linen Factory.
American paratroopers of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment pose with two citizens. The building was a linen factory and as such in use into the 1960s. Until 2002 the building housed a music theater. When a new  theater was constructed next door, the former factory was demolished, except its outer wall. In the Now- photo the new theater can be seen through the glass-less windows. It is largely obscured behind scaffolding wrapped in green mesh. Behind the old wall is an open-air stage.


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Now & Then photographs)

 

Eindhoven May, 1945
Through the contact form we were asked where some photo's of Canadian soldier Elwood Wilson, serving with the 65th tank transport company, RCASC were taken. We found the location on Leeuwenstraat (Lion Street) in Eindhoven, Holland.

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Now & Then photographs)


 

Eindhoven May, 1945
Canadian soldier Elwood Wilson, serving with the 65th tank transport company, RCASC with his buddies on Eindhoven's Leeuwenstraat.


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Now & Then photographs)

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